Caselaw Database - All Cases

ESCR-Net Caselaw Database: A database on domestic, regional and international decisions regarding Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

In 1993, the Campaign for Fiscal Equity, as well as several students and their parents, filed a complaint asserting that New York State's educational financing scheme, in violation of the state Constitution, fails to provide public school students in New York City, an opportunity to obtain a sound basic education. Gross underfunding of schools had allegedly led to a scarcity of basic resources, as well as low test scores and graduation rates.

Twenty deputies of the Latvian Parliament (the Saeima) claimed that certain employers were not paying social insurance premiums into a fund for their employees. The deputies asserted a breach of the constitutional right to social security and Articles 9 and 11 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) since the State had failed to ensure the relevant legislation ensured that premiums were paid by employers.

Representatives of the Lamenxay and Kayleyphapopyet indigenous communities, both of the Enxet-Sanapana people, started proceedings aimed at recovering their ancestral land, which had been sold by the Paraguayan State to private persons. After five years of the State's failure to comply with a court decision acknowledging the constitutional land right of one of the communities, in 1996 a petition was filed with the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights against the State of Paraguay.

Callahan was a class-action suit on behalf of homeless men in the Bowery area of Manhattan seeking a temporary mandatory injunction requiring the City of New York to provide shelter to homeless men.

In 1990 the non-profit agency that had provided sign language interpreter services in the lower mainland of British Columbia began experiencing serious financial difficulties and sought funding through officials at the Ministry of Health.  It was turned down.    

Autism‑Europe alleged that implementation by France of statutory instruments relating to provision of education to persons with disabilities was extremely poor. The overwhelming majority (80‑90 percent) of young adults and children with autism had no access to adequate educational services.