Ireland

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**This article has been originally published by Open Global Rights. The author, Koldo Casla, is a research associate at the Institute of Health &...

On 24 April, the European Anti-Poverty Network (EAPN), which coordinates the European Minimum Income Network, launched a bus tour across Europe to raise awareness of the importance of adequate,...

Amnesty International has released a publication on the process of shadow reporting. The document, "Holding Government to Account: A Guide to Shadow Reporting on Economic Social and Cultural...

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The case was brought by disadvantaged children in need of accommodation and treatment in high support units.  The children asserted that the state was under a constitutional obligation to provide them with special care and appropriate educational facilities.  The state agreed that such facilities were necessary and had begun the planning process for building them.  However the projects suffered many administrative and logistical delays.  A High Court Judge issued a mandatory injunction (an order requiring the performance of a specific act), incorporating the state’s plan and ordering the go

The plaintiffs in this case were members of the Irish Travelling community, traditionally a nomadic people. This particular group of Travellers lived on an unofficial halting or caravan, site in Limerick City for over eight years, in conditions of extreme deprivation and squalor, without running water, toilet facilities, domestic refuse storage and collection, and hard surfaces for their caravans.

In 2005, under the Article 26 procedure of the Constitution, the Irish Supreme Court reviewed the constitutionality of a bill referred to it by the President. This bill authorized charges for in-patient services, provided by the public health service, to be imposed on certain people, in most cases, elderly people of limited means.

Bringing economic, social and cultural rights home to Ireland

Ireland signed the Optional...

Shortly after the plaintiff, Jamie Sinnott, was born in 1977, doctors discovered he was severely autistic.  For the next 22 years of his life, his mother attempted to provide her son with basic speech, language, and motor skills, as well as toilet-training.  Unfortunately, she discovered that the few institutions for children with severely physically and mentally disabilities in Cork, Ireland did not meet the continuous education needs of her autistic child. In 1997, Mrs.

In 2003, four year old Jeremiah Cronin, diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity and autism, was assessed as needing a 32-hour-per-week intensive home-based program to meet his special needs while awaiting placement in Cork CABAS School.  His mother instituted an action for injunctive relief directing the Minister for Education (“the Minister”) to provide such home-based tuition for 29 hours per week during the child’s pre-school phase.  She claimed that her son was entitled to a free primary education under the Irish Constitution, relying on the Irish Supreme Court’s reference to uph

Applicant Paul O’Donoghue was born in November 1984 and contracted Reyes Syndrome, a serious viral infection, at eight months old, suffering brain damage as a result.