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A community group's campaign to change mental health care policy, using a participatory, “bottom-up” approach to setting human rights indicators and benchmarks defined by group members themselves. The Belfast Mental Health Rights Group—a group of service users,...

This case concerns a claim for damages by a woman with severe disabilities, Mrs. Bernard and her husband, Mr. Bernard, her sole caregiver, alleging that the local Housing Department did not provide them with accommodations suitably adapted for her disability. This failure, it was contended, constituted a violation of the European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR). Damages were sought under the Human Rights Act (HRA), which is the implementing legislation for the ECHR in the UK.

ESCR-Net have developed a Scoping Report highlighting six cases of corporate capture in different industries and across different regions.  The Scoping Report is a preliminary...

Country: 
United Kingdom
Working Group(s) / Area(s) of Work: 
OP-ICESCR

On 23 September, ESCR-Net sent a letter to the Coordinating Committee of Special Procedures to express concern regarding statements issued by members of the parliament (MPs) of the United Kingdom following a preliminary report from an official mission to that country by the Special Rapporteur on adequate housing, Raquel Rolnik.

 

 

 

Country: 
United Kingdom
Working Group(s) / Area(s) of Work: 
Strategic Litigation
Economic Policy and Human Rights
Monitoring
OP-ICESCR
Country: 
United Kingdom
Working Group(s) / Area(s) of Work: 
Corporate Accountability
OP-ICESCR

Mark Keenan received intermittent psychiatric treatment since the age of 21. At 28, Keenan was admitted to prison, initially to the prison health center. Several attempts were made to transfer him to the general population, but his mental health worsened each time. Following a transfer attempt, he assaulted two guards and his sentence was increased by twenty-eight days. The next day Keenan hung himself.

The claimants in this joined action were asylum-seekers who had sought asylum after their initial entry to the UK. The defendant, Secretary of State for the Home Department, refused support under Section 55 of the Nationality, Immigration, and Asylum Act 2002 ("the Act") with regard to accommodation. Section 55 allowed refusal of support to asylum seekers who failed to make their claim as soon as reasonably practicable.

The applicant, Ms. N, a Ugandan national, entered the UK in March 1998. She was seriously ill and was diagnosed as HIV positive. She completed an asylum application within a few days, claiming she had been raped by the National Resistance Movement in Uganda because of her association with the Lord's Resistance Army. In August 1998, Ms. N developed Kaposi's sarcoma. In March 2001, a physician prepared an expert report which expressed that without regular antiretroviral treatment and monitoring, the applicant's life expectancy would be less than one year.