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Matodzi Ramuhovhi and Thinamaano Edson Netshituka applied to the Constitutional Court for confirmation of the Limpopo High Court, Thohoyandou’s ruling of invalidity of Section 7(1) of the Recognition of Customary Marriages Act 120 of 1998 (“Recognition Act”). The High Court ruled 7(1) to be invalid because it discriminated against women in polygamous marriages concluded before the Recognition Act on two grounds: (a) gender and (b) race, ethnic or social origin. This same section had been deemed unconstitutional as it related to monogamous marriages in Gumede vs.

The Gumedes were married in 1968, before the Recognition of Customary Marriages Act 120 of 1998, which entered into force on November 15, 2000. Section 7(1) of the Recognition Act provided that customary marriages entered into prior to the date of the commencement of the Act (old marriages) were governed by customary law, while section 7(2) provided that customary marriages entered into after the date of commencement of the Act (new marriages) were marriages in community of property. Ms. Gumede was directly affected by Section 7 after Mr.

When Makhosazane Eunice Sacolo, a Swazi woman, was left by her husband, she was unable to sell any of the livestock that they owned, even those that she had purchased with her own money. Under eSwatini’s common law of marital power, that property was registered in her husband’s name. This common law doctrine, as well as the Marriage Act of 1964, also prohibited married women from concluding contracts without her husband’s permission.

In 2014 and 2015, an outbreak of Ebola in Sierra Leone forced schools to close for nine months. One consequence of the closures was a significant spike in pregnancies among teenage girls (in some areas, rates went up 65%). As a result, the then-Minister of Education, Science and Technology publicly stated that pregnant girls would not be able to attend mainstream schools while they were pregnant in order to avoid adversely influencing their peers.

Case Filing Contributes to Collective Initiative to Develop a Feminist Global Social Pact on Care

Last month, in the case of ...

The petitioner, Sandesh Bansal, is a health activist and member of Jan Adhikaar Manch, a nongovernmental organization (NGO) working to raise concern over the high maternal mortality rate (MMR) in Madhya Pradesh as a part of their “Save our Mothers” campaign. The case was also part of Human Rights Law Network’s (HRLN’s) national litigation strategy to address India’s high maternal mortality and morbidity rates. Petitioner alleged that the state failed to provide basic and adequate maternal healthcare.

Following discussions within ESCR-Net’s membership on climate and environmental justice and human rights in relation to the COVID-19 crisis, multiple members co-authored short articles in this context, including the following piece which was originally published on...

Statement: "Unchecked corporate porwer paved the way for COVID-19 and globally, women are at the frontline"
17 March 2020

>> ...

Developed by an ESCR-Net Member

Statement: "COVID-19: Capitalism’s Mask Has Slipped"
March, 2020

>> https://www.iwraw-ap.org/covid-19-capitalisms-mask-has-slipped/

 

Developed by an ESCR-Net Member