Work (Right to) and Workers’ Rights

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On August 31, ESCR-Net’s Working Group on Women and ESCR launched a series of briefing papers in Arabic.

The briefing papers present specific and systemic challenges to the realization of women’s ESCR in practice and explore

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Following the exhaustion of available legal avenues of redress in the Republic of Korea (Korea), this communication was submitted before the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (Committee) in 2012. The case concerns mandatory tests for HIV/AIDS and illegal drugs use required of foreign teachers of English in Korea. Korean citizen teachers and ethnic Korean noncitizen teachers are not required to undergo such scrutiny.

The Women and ESCR Working Group launched revised briefing papers on Land,...

ESCR-Net’s Women and ESCR Working Group briefing paper series focuses on the intersection between women and specific economic, social and cultural rights (ESCR) issues. The papers present specific and systemic challenges to the realization of women’s ESCR in practice...

Developed thanks to the collective work of ESCR-Net Members

General Comment No. 23 (2016) on the Right to just and favorable conditions of work (article 7 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights)

        I.    Introduction...

In 2012, the African Commission on Human and People’s Rights (Commission) accepted this communication as admissible for consideration. The case was filed on behalf of three prominent human rights defenders working in Sudan, Monim Elgak, Amir Suliman and the late Osman Hummaida, who were targeted for their alleged cooperation with the ICC in its investigation of several Sudanese political leaders. The three men were arrested by Sudan’s National and Intelligence Services (NISS), tortured and maltreated for three days.

This case came before the Supreme Court of India, on appeal, against a Bombay High Court verdict striking down the Maharashtra government’s statewide ban on dance performances in bars. The ban dates back to August 2005, and prohibited ‘any type of dancing' in an "eating house, permit room or beer bar", but made an exception for dance performances in three stars hotels and above, and other elite establishments. The State justified the ban by asserting that bar dancing corrupts morals, fuels trafficking and prostitution, and causes exploitation of women bar dancers.

The ILO Convention 189 and recommendation 201 spells out all the protection that is needed to ensure a decent life for domestic workers. This International law if ratified by the Trinidad and Tobago government must ensure that domestic workers are brought up in line as all other workers. Firstly we...

The National Union of Domestic Employees (NUDE) of Trinidad and Tobago is campaigning to secure recognition for domestic workers as workers under the Industrial Relations Act, organizing around a Caribbean-wide...