Sexual and Reproductive Rights

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In 1991, the Philippines delegated responsibility for “people’s health and safety” to the local level. In exercise of this power, an executive order 003 (“EO 003”) was issued in Manila, in 2000 which declared that the city would take an “affirmative stand on pro-life issues”. In response to a joint submission from NGOs in 2008, the UN Committee on Elimination of Discrimination against Women (Committee) conducted an inquiry into alleged human rights violations resulting from the enforcement of EO 003.  

Plataforma Dhesca and civil society organizations presented their priorities on Human Rights

Patricia Mansilla Martínez, a member of Bolivian Parliament, filed an abstract action of unconstitutionality against articles 56, 58, 245, 250, 254, 258, 263, 264, 265, 266, 269, 315, and 327 of the Criminal Code for discrimination against women. The Court did not consider the constitutionality of articles 254, 315 or 317, as they are no longer in force.

Following a newspaper report regarding a destitute woman who died on a busy street four days after giving birth to a baby girl, the Court brought this public interest litigation (PIL) on its own motion. The Court also asked the Human Rights Law Network (HRLN), an ESCR-Net member organization, to file an amicus brief on the status of maternal health for destitute pregnant and lactating women in Delhi, and to suggest appropriate remedies. HRLN’s amicus outlined myriad state failures to implement government schemes providing for food and health services to women and marginalized groups.

In 2007, petitioners brought a case seeking mandamus to enforce obligations of women’s reproductive health rights under Article 20 (2) of the Interim Constitution and international human rights treaties to which Nepal is party. Petitioners argued that despite budgetary allotments by the government, no meaningful or effective programs had been initiated by the State to address the problem of uterine prolapse, as evidenced by the hundreds of thousands of women suffering from the condition. 

The campaign "A Father does not rape" try to make visible the figures of sexual violence in the family, calling against impunity and for new masculinities

The Center for Reproductive Rights and Advocacia Cidadã Pelos Direitos Humanos submitted the first maternal mortality case brought to the U.N. Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) in November 2007.

Urging full access to contraceptive and family planning services, the Center for Reproductive Rights (CRR) praised the governments of Argentina, Denmark, Ethiopia and Morocco for their leadership on this issue within the United Nations Human Rights Council. 

The petition in this public interest litigation (PIL) case cited data from the States of Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, and Maharashtra, regarding government practices regarding female sterilization, which lacked counseling or informed consent, lacked pre- and post-operative care, and included unhygienic and un-anesthetized operating conditions, sterilization of minors, coercion and cruelty.  The PIL requested the Court to direct the state governments to comply with the Ministry of Health and Welfare’s Guidelines on Standards of Female Sterilization, enacted in October 1999 (“the Guidelines”).

This Resource Guide aims to improve the existing knowledge and understanding of activists and lawyers on international norms and standards, such as substantive equality, to support effective advocacy on women’s economic, social and cultural rights.

Developed thanks to the collective work of ESCR-Net Members