Gender equality

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Nazdeek has partnered with communities in Delhi to develop effective and accessible strategies for monitoring essential services that they are legally entitled to, seek redressal of individual right violations, and, at a collective level, advocate for systemic improvements in the delivery of...

Developed by an ESCR-Net Member

This report explores how Rural, indigenous, migrant, and urban poor (RIMUP) women in Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Lao, Myanmar, Nepal, the Philippines, Taiwan and Thailand strengthened their fights against increased inequality and marginalization through a Feminist Participatory Action Research...

Developed by an ESCR-Net Member
Shayara Bano and others v. Union of India and others, Writ Petition (C) No. 118 of 2016

Shayara Bano was married for 15 years. In 2016, her husband divorced her through talaq–e-bidat (triple talaq). This is an Islamic practice that permits men to arbitrarily and unilaterally effect instant and irrevocable divorce by pronouncing the word ‘talaq’ (Arabic for divorce) three times at once in oral, written or, more recently, electronic form.

R (on the application of UNISON) (Appellant) v Lord Chancellor (Respondent), [2017] UKSC 51

Prior to the enactment of the Employment Tribunals and the Employment Appeal Tribunal Fees Order 2013 (Fees Order) in the UK, a claimant could pursue and appeal employment proceedings without paying any fee. Fees were introduced under the Fees Order, with the amount varying depending on factors including the claim classification and complexity. Type A claims (£390 fee) generally required less time to resolve. Type B claims (£1,200) included unfair dismissal, equal pay and discrimination claims.

Women working in agriculture in Tunisia continue to face serious risks as a result of unsafe transportation to their places of work, sometimes leading to deadly accidents. On Monday, 36 women working in the agricultural sector were injured in an accident during travel to their...

To commemorate the Global Day of Action for Access to Safe and Legal Abortion, ESCR-Net member the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights (EIPR) and the global alliance...

Via participation of several member representatives and several workshops, ESCR-Net participated in the Asia-Pacific Feminist Forum (APFF) which took place in Chiang Mai, Thailand, between 6-9 September 2017.

Organized by the...

Swaziland High Court advances women's property rights

Nombuyiselo Sihlongonyane and Mholi Joseph were married under civil rites and in community of property.[1] In January 2013, on the basis of her husband’s infidelity and mismanagement of their estate, Sihlongonyane applied to the High Court of Swaziland (High Court) to have her husband removed as the administrator of their joint property.

Swaziland Supreme Court advances women's property rights

Mary-Joyce Doo Aphane, a woman’s rights activist, commenced legal proceedings in the High Court of Swaziland (High Court) against the Registrar of Deeds, the Minister of Justice and Constitutional Affairs, and the Attorney General, arguing that Section 16(3) of the Deeds Registry Act, 1968 (Act) violated her constitutional right to equality because it forbids women married in community of property[1] to register immov