Equality and Non-discrimination

Primary tabs

Over the past two years, dozens of ESCR-Net members engaged in cross-network discussions to develop the analytical report “Building sustainable peace. Transforming conflict-affected situations for women.” The report argues that in dealing with conflict-affected situations, it is vital to adopt an intersectional feminist approach via a human rights framework, and provides seven lessons and principles to guide the work in the field.

The Legal Resources Centre (LRC) represented Mrs. Agnes Sithole, a seventy-two-year-old woman living in KwaZulu-Natal who married Gideon Sithole in 1972 out of community of property in terms of section 22(6) of the Black Administration Act 38 of 1927 (BAA) and the Commission for Gender Equality in a challenge to the Matrimonial Property Act of 1984. Between 1972 and 1985 Mrs. Sithole worked as a housewife and ran a home-based clothing business successfully to educate her children and assist the family household expenses. After the relationship between Mr. and Mrs. Sithole deteriorated, Mr.

In early 2016, the Acting Superintendent-General issued a circular that demanded learners present their birth certificates to the school administration. Learners unable to submit their birth certificates would no longer receive funding. This had to effect of forcing schools to exclude undocumented children or to allow them to remain while forcing schools to spread already scarce resources. Although the circular demanded birth certificates, in practice schools also excluded non-national children where they were unable to present permits which allowed them to reside in the country.

On November 28, 1902 Mr. Karel Johannes Cornelius De Jager and Mrs. Catherine Dorothea De Jager executed a will leaving certain farms to their children during their lives and thereafter to male descendants only, until the fourth generation. In 2015, Mr. Kalvyn De Jager, who had inherited half of the farm shares, died with no male children. In his will, he left his share of the farms to his five daughters.

Human rights lawyers have threatened legal action against the German, Norwegian, and Canadian governments today for obstructing global efforts to increase access to COVID-19 vaccines and other healthcare technologies. 

The move comes as state delegates from around the...

Y.I., a mother of three children, was arrested on October 8, 2013, on suspicion of drug trafficking. She had taken opiates for six years starting in 2004, and at the time of her arrest had recently begun taking drugs again and had been allowing others to take drugs in her home. A police officer for juvenile affairs also wrote multiple reports stating that Y.I. had been neglecting her parental responsibilities. Later the same month, her oldest child was taken to live with his biological father and the other children were put into public care.

The Inter-American Court of Human Rights has issued a judgment in Guachalá Chimbó and Others vs. Ecuador, finding intersectional discrimination based on disability and class and violations of the right to...

The Constitutional Court accumulated 19 cases involving women who, at the time of the events in question, were pregnant, lactating, or on maternity leave, and worked in various positions in the public sector governed by the Organic Law of Public Service (LOSEP). The Court addresses the violation of pregnant and lactating women’s rights and provides further protections by formally recognizing the right to care.

Background: On December 11, 1998, an explosion occurred in a fireworks factory in Santo Antônio de Jesus, Brazil. The factory consisted of a set of tents located in paddocks with shared worktables. As a result of the explosion, 60 people died and six were injured. Among those who lost their lives were 59 women, 19 of whom were girls, and one boy. Among the survivors were three adult women, two boys and one girl. Four of the deceased women were pregnant; one of them was able to give birth before dying.