United Kingdom

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UK Court expands definition of domestic violence in context of housing rights

The appellant was a married woman who left her family home with her two young children because she felt her husband treated her as less than human. He yelled at her, withheld finances, and made her afraid he would hit her or take the children away. She went to the local housing authority for help finding accommodation. As her husband had never hit her or threatened to physically harm her, the housing authority refused to assist her. They believed that because there was no physical violence, it was reasonable for her to stay in the home.

UK Court advances women’s enjoyment of the rights to adequate housing and social protection

The Sandwell Metropolitan Council formed a new tax plan pursuant to a national change in tax law. Previously, low-income persons would be given financial assistance to pay council taxes, whereas under the new plan, individuals’ tax liability was lowered based on financial status. The relevant statute stated that local authorities would create locally-tailored plans to determine tax liability by creating classes based on income, capital, and number of dependents.

These resources look at the work of ESCR-Net member Participation and Practice of Rights based in Northern Ireland (UK). 

In particular, the article attached explores the ways in which marginalised groups in Northern Ireland have employed and translated for practical use human rights...

Developed by an ESCR-Net Member

On 24 April, the European Anti-Poverty Network (EAPN), which coordinates the European Minimum Income Network, launched a bus tour across Europe to raise awareness of the importance of adequate,...

Data and evidence can play a crucial role in advancing social justice and human rights. Yet ESCR-Net members have recognized that too often data production does not reflect the lived realities of peoples who face poverty, inequality and injustice.

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Economic and social rights is a crucial area of human rights law that has long been marginalised in the UK. This is despite the fact that the rights to housing, work, an adequate standard of living, food, social security, education, water and health are central to human survival and development...

Developed by an ESCR-Net Member
UK Supreme Court cancels case fees to ensure workers’ access to justice

Prior to the enactment of the Employment Tribunals and the Employment Appeal Tribunal Fees Order 2013 (Fees Order) in the UK, a claimant could pursue and appeal employment proceedings without paying any fee. Fees were introduced under the Fees Order, with the amount varying depending on factors including the claim classification and complexity. Type A claims (£390 fee) generally required less time to resolve. Type B claims (£1,200) included unfair dismissal, equal pay and discrimination claims.

The UK is a profoundly unequal society. This distribution of income is more unequal than the average in both the EU and the Euro area (source: Eurostat; data from 2015). The UK’s Gini coefficient is 32.4, where 0 means absolute equality and 100 means that all income is...

Developed by an ESCR-Net Member
Country: 
United Kingdom
Working Group(s) / Area(s) of Work: 
Monitoring