Adequate Standard of Living (right to)

Primary tabs

This case concerns the Ratlam municipality’s obligations to its people under Section 123 M. P. Municipalities Act of 1961. These obligations include the provision of sanitary facilities and the prevention of street contamination from a nearby alcohol plant. The residents of the Ratlam municipality, frustrated at the lack of sanitary facilities and the contamination in the streets, brought suit against the municipality under Section 133 of the Criminal Procedure Code for public nuisance.

Refugees with Temporary Residency Must Be Treated the Same as Citizens for the Purpose of Social Benefits, EU Court of Justice Rules

Mr. Ayubi’s refugee status qualified him for a three-year residency permit and enabled him to apply for state assistance. Under Austrian law, Mr. Ayubi’s temporary residence status restricted him to receiving the minimum amount of benefits, and the District Administrative Authority of Linz-Land granted him the minimum basic allowance and a temporary supplemental allowance.

On 30 October 2018, the Human Rights Committee (HRC) adopted General Comment No. 36on the Right to Life (under Article 6 of the International Covenant on Civil and...

Nazdeek has partnered with communities in Delhi to develop effective and accessible strategies for monitoring essential services that they are legally entitled to, seek redressal of individual right violations, and, at a collective level, advocate for systemic improvements in the delivery of...

Developed by an ESCR-Net Member

This report explores how Rural, indigenous, migrant, and urban poor (RIMUP) women in nine countries strengthened their fights against increased inequality and marginalization through a Feminist Participatory Action Research (FPAR). The program 'Changing Development Inside Out' was facilitated by...

Developed by an ESCR-Net Member
UK Supreme Court cancels case fees to ensure workers’ access to justice

Prior to the enactment of the Employment Tribunals and the Employment Appeal Tribunal Fees Order 2013 (Fees Order) in the UK, a claimant could pursue and appeal employment proceedings without paying any fee. Fees were introduced under the Fees Order, with the amount varying depending on factors including the claim classification and complexity. Type A claims (£390 fee) generally required less time to resolve. Type B claims (£1,200) included unfair dismissal, equal pay and discrimination claims.

10
Oct
2017

The Legal Center for Arab Minority Rights in Israel – Adalah has sent a letter to Israeli authorities responsible for the central bus station in Tel Aviv to demand an...