Work (Right to) and Workers’ Rights

Primary tabs

In 1998, Congress approved Amendment 20 to the Brazilian Federal Constitution of 1988, thereby altering the country’s social security system. The amendment imposed a ceiling of R$1200 on social security benefits per beneficiary. On its face, the R$1200 maximum purported to apply neutrally to several benefits categories, including with respect to pregnancy-related leave.

UN Committee on ESCR addresses the impact of unpaid care work on women’s social security access

Marcia Cecilia Trujillo Calero made 29 years’ worth of retirement contributions to the Ecuadorian Institute of Social Security (IESS). Of the 305 contributions she made, approximately half were voluntary contributions made from 1981 through 1995, when she was an unpaid care worker at home, caring for her three children. During an eight-month period starting in 1989, Ms. Trujillo paused her voluntary payments, though she retroactively paid them in full in April 1990. Afterward, Ms.

African Children's Rights Committee holds Mauritania Accountable for Child Slavery

Said Ould Salem and his younger brother, Yarg Ould Salem, were born to a Haratine mother, part of Mauritania’s former slave class. While slavery is now outlawed in Mauritania, the practice remains widespread, commonly victimizing members of the Haratine minority. From birth onwards, both brothers became slaves to the El Hassine family. The two children worked seven days a week without rest, including on Fridays.

Inter-American Court recognizes the direct enforceability of ESCR

Alfredo Lagos del Campo was fired from his job on July 1, 1989. Mr. Lagos del Campo had previously been a union leader but, at the time of his dismissal, he was the President of the Electoral Committee, an elected representative of the company’s Industrial Community (a type of employee organization in Peru created through law). Mr. Lagos del Campo gave an interview for a magazine in his capacity as President of the Electoral Committee, stating he had publicly denounced actions by his employer who he believed was pressuring workers using extortion and coercive tactics.

UK Supreme Court cancels case fees to ensure workers’ access to justice

Prior to the enactment of the Employment Tribunals and the Employment Appeal Tribunal Fees Order 2013 (Fees Order) in the UK, a claimant could pursue and appeal employment proceedings without paying any fee. Fees were introduced under the Fees Order, with the amount varying depending on factors including the claim classification and complexity. Type A claims (£390 fee) generally required less time to resolve. Type B claims (£1,200) included unfair dismissal, equal pay and discrimination claims.

Women working in agriculture in Tunisia continue to face serious risks as a result of unsafe transportation to their places of work, sometimes leading to deadly accidents. On Monday, 36 women working in the agricultural sector were injured in an accident during travel to their...

The Zimbabwe Environmental Law Association (ZELA) published this report analyzing their findings after researching the current legal developments in...

Developed by an ESCR-Net Member

The Fundación para el Desarollo de Políticas Sustentables (FUNDEPS) proposes quotas as a way to ensure that males to not have a majority in...