Work (Right to) and Workers’ Rights

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In Bogota, recyclable materials have traditionally been collected and sold by individuals and families organized into recycling associations. Recyclers are among the poorest, most marginalized members of society.

Recycling activities in Colombia have traditionally been carried out by extremely poor and marginalized sectors of society, who collect materials from landfills or inorganic waste from the streets to transport and sell them as recyclable material to intermediary informal warehouses of the national and multinational industry from refuse deposited on the street and sell it to warehouses for modest sums.

On April 17-19, 2013, ESCR-Net and the Center for Human Rights and Development brought together lawyers, experts, and community leaders from Mongolia to enhance knowledge about the Optional Protocol to the ICESCR; build networks of solidarity and support among lawyers and activists and support Mongolian organizations to identify potential cases that could be advanced under the OP-ICESCR.

The case was presented by the Human Rights Law Network (HRLN) to the Constitutional Court in light of the non-enforcement of a previous decision that established guidelines against sexual harassment at the work place in India: Vishaka vs.

Georgina Ahamefule began working at the Imperial Medical Center as an auxiliary nurse in 1989. In 1995, while she was pregnant, she developed boils on her skin and sought medical attention from her employer Dr. Alex Molukwu, who conducted medical examinations and diagnostic tests without disclosing to her the nature and the outcome of the tests. Georgina tested positive for HIV and her employment contract was promptly terminated.

Country: 
Philippines
Working Group(s) / Area(s) of Work: 
Women & ESCR
Corporate Accountability
Social Movements & Grassroots Groups

R.K.B.’s employer accused her of having an affair with a male colleague and dismissed her from the position but did not dismiss the male colleague, and threatened to “spread rumours about her relationships with other men” to pressure her to sign a document, attesting that she had been paid all her benefits upon termination. R.K.B. presented a claim to the Committee, alleging that her employer, a hairdressing salon, had unfairly terminated her contract of employment based on gender stereotypes.

The petition was presented by advocates of the Nepalese organization, Pro Public, to protect the international and constitutional rights of thousands of women employees working in cabin and dance restaurants and massage parlors. These businesses have spread throughout urban areas in Nepal over the last ten years with women compromising more than 80% of all employees.

Read this joint submission on the human rights implications of the financial crisis and subsequent domestic policy responses in the USA. In particular, it focuses on the human rights obligation to protect and fulfill economic and social rights as well as the need for transparency, accountability and participation in the making of macroeconomic policy.
Country: 
Australia
Working Group(s) / Area(s) of Work: 
Corporate Accountability
Strategic Litigation