Caselaw Database - All Cases

ESCR-Net Caselaw Database: A database on domestic, regional and international decisions regarding Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

Martinez-Cuevas and Aguilar filed a class action lawsuit against their employer, DeRuyter Bros. Dairy Co., seeking in part a judgement declaring RCW 49.46.130(2)(g) of the Washington Minimum Wage Act (MWA) unconstitutional. The workers claimed that the DeRuyter Brother’s Dairy Company failed to meet minimum wage standards, denied adequate breaks or time for meals, and failed to compensate for work done prior to and following many workers’ shifts.

Ten petitioners, on behalf of 326 other residents of City Cotton and Upendo villages alleged that the respondents (1st Moi Education Centre Co. LTD, 2nd the Inspector General of police, 3rd the Cabinet Secretary for Lands, Housing, and Urban Development, and 4th the Attorney General) violated the petitioners’ right to housing guaranteed under Article 43 of the Kenyan Constitution.

Y.I., a mother of three children, was arrested on October 8, 2013, on suspicion of drug trafficking. She had taken opiates for six years starting in 2004, and at the time of her arrest had recently begun taking drugs again and had been allowing others to take drugs in her home. A police officer for juvenile affairs also wrote multiple reports stating that Y.I. had been neglecting her parental responsibilities. Later the same month, her oldest child was taken to live with his biological father and the other children were put into public care.

Mrs. Dobson was a community nurse employed by North Cumbria Integrated Care working two days a week. As a mother of three children, two of whom have disabilities, Mrs. Dobson relied on the ability to have a fixed work schedule. From 2008 to 2016 Mrs. Dobson maintained a 15-hour work week over a period of two fixed days without issue. In 2013 Mrs. Dobson’s employer first asked Mrs. Dobson to work the occasional weekend, but after explaining her family dynamic and work that she needed to complete at home the issue was dropped.

The Constitutional Court accumulated 19 cases involving women who, at the time of the events in question, were pregnant, lactating, or on maternity leave, and worked in various positions in the public sector governed by the Organic Law of Public Service (LOSEP). The Court addresses the violation of pregnant and lactating women’s rights and provides further protections by formally recognizing the right to care.

The claimants in this action are the Ogale and Bille communities in Rivers State, Nigeria, representing approximately 50,000 individuals. The claimants allege widespread environmental damage, including groundwater contamination, as the result of oil spills by Shell Petroleum Development Company of Nigeria (SPDC). The two defendants are Royal Dutch Shell Plc (RDS), the UK parent company, and SPDC, a Nigerian-registered subsidiary of RDS.

In 2003, seven-year-old Andrea was murdered by her father, who subsequently committed suicide, during a court-approved parental visitation. Andrea’s mother, Andrea González, had reported over forty-seven (47) instances of physical abuse to the police and sought restraining orders against him to protect herself and her daughter – but the father had refused to accept supervised visitations and a court of law eventually allowed for the unsupervised visits that led to the death of Andrea. After the murder, Ms.

Background: On December 11, 1998, an explosion occurred in a fireworks factory in Santo Antônio de Jesus, Brazil. The factory consisted of a set of tents located in paddocks with shared worktables. As a result of the explosion, 60 people died and six were injured. Among those who lost their lives were 59 women, 19 of whom were girls, and one boy. Among the survivors were three adult women, two boys and one girl. Four of the deceased women were pregnant; one of them was able to give birth before dying.

In September 2011, 3,000 families were given only 7 days prior notice before they were evicted from the land next to the Wilson Airport. Their shelters were destroyed. The Kenya Airports Authority owned the plot of land next to the airport, but the resident families of the Mitumba Village had occupied the property for some time.

At the time of her death, the deceased, Maria Mahlangu, was a domestic worker in a private home in South Africa. Ms. Mahlangu’s daughter and grandchild were financially dependent upon her at the time of her death. Ms. Mahlangu’s daughter asked the Department of Labour for help in the form of compensation under the Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act (COIDA) or unemployment insurance benefits. The Department of Labour denied both because Ms.